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Fourth Grade


 

Math Products

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Division
Ages from 8 to 11
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Division War
Ages from 8 to 11
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Multiplication
Ages from 8 to 11
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Multiplication War
Ages from 8 to 11
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Math
Ages from 9 to 10
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Problem Solving
Ages from 9 to 10
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Math Skills, Grade 4
Ages from 9 to 10
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Math



Fourth Grade Math

In addition to expanding on the multiplication skills acquired in third grade, fourth graders are expected to divide numbers with up to three digits by a single-digit number. Decimals and fractions are also an important focus in fourth grade. By the end of the year, your child should be able to:
  • Use place value to read, write, compare, and order whole numbers through 999,999,999 and decimals involving tenths and hundredths
  • Describe, order, and compare fractional parts of whole objects and sets of objects
  • Generate equivalent fractions
  • Model fraction quantities greater than one using pictures and objects
  • Compare decimals and fractions
  • Add and subtract to solve problems involving whole numbers and decimals
  • Model factors and products using arrays and area models
  • Represent multiplication and division situations in picture, word, and number form
  • Apply multiplication facts through 12 x 12
  • Multiply up to two digits times two digits
  • Divide one-digit divisors and three-digit dividends
  • Round whole numbers to the nearest ten, hundred, or thousand
  • Estimate
  • Use patterns to remember basic multiplication and division facts
  • Use patterns to multiply by 10 and 100
  • Identify right, acute, and obtuse angles
  • Recognize parallel and intersecting lines
  • Identify two- and three-dimensional geometric figures
  • Connect transformations to congruence and symmetry
  • Locate and name points on a number line using whole numbers, fractions, and decimals
  • Estimate and use measurement tools to determine length, area, capacity, and weight/mass
  • Convert between different units of measurement
  • Use models of standard cubic units to estimate and measure volume
  • Explain the difference between weight and mass
  • Measure temperature in degrees Fahrenheit and Celsius
  • Solve problems involving elapsed time
  • Read bar graphs




Reading Products

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Spanish
Ages from 7 to 10
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Reading
Ages from 9 to 10
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Vocabulary
Ages from 9 to 10
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Reading Comprehension
Ages from 9 to 10
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Reading



Fourth Grade Reading

Fourth graders continue to explore the mechanics of language, breaking words into syllables and understanding the origins of vocabulary derived from other languages. Your child will be learning to read critically by comparing and contrasting different pieces of writing, determining the themes of different texts, and explaining how an author uses languages in a story. By the end of the year, your child should be able to:
  • Accurately decode unfamiliar multi-syllabic words
  • Determine the meaning of English words derived from other languages, including Latin and Greek
  • Use context to determine the meaning of unfamiliar or multiple-meaning words
  • Complete analogies using knowledge of antonyms and synonyms
  • Identify the meaning of common idioms
  • Use a dictionary or glossary to determine the meanings, syllabication, and pronunciation of unknown words
  • Compare and contrast points of view in different stories
  • Analyze, make inferences, and draw conclusion about the author’s purpose in a writing
  • Explain the difference between a stated and an implied purpose for an expository text
  • Understand how an author’s language creates imagery in literary text
  • Identify the use of similes and metaphors to produce imagery
  • Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama,
  • Determine the theme of a reading from details
  • Summarize a text, maintaining meaning and logical order
  • Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic
  • Interpret information presented visually, orally, or through charts, graphs, diagrams, or timelines
  • Distinguish fact from opinion and explain how to verify what is a fact
  • Summarize and explain the theme of a work of fiction




Activities Products

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Activities



Fourth Grade Activities

Here are some simple activities to try with your fourth grader:
  • Write a simple story. Do not include any adjectives, adverbs, or sensory words. Challenge your child to rewrite the story in a way that makes it far more colorful, descriptive, and exciting.
  • Give your child magazines or newspaper article that contains at least one fact and one opinion. Have your child circle the fact and underline the opinion.
  • Encourage your child to read independently, and to discuss with you the books and stories he or she enjoys. Set aside a time each month where every member of the family—including parents-- discusses a book he or she has read, sharing a short summary and a few points about what made the book enjoyable. (Younger siblings can participate by talking about a book that has been read aloud.) By showing your child that you enjoy reading for pleasure, you are setting a strong example.
  • Play synonym and antonym memory. Write synonym pairs or antonym pairs on the back of note cards. Next, set up a memory game with all cards facing down. With your child, choose pairs and see if they match.
  • Fill a jar with small objects such as buttons, marbles, or jellybeans. Then have your child estimate how many objects are in the jar. Have your child make an educated guess and explain how he or she estimated the amount. Empty out the contents of the jar to reveal the correct number. Try this same experiment with other containers and objects, varying the shape and size.
  • Go on an angle hunt with your child. See if your child can spot acute, right, and obtuse angles around your neighborhood. Does a tree branch have an obtuse angle? Does a handle bar on the merry-go-round have a right angle? Where can acute angles be found?
  • Home improvement projects offer a great opportunity to practice math skills like measurements and estimating. Have your child help measure windows for blinds or determine how many bags of soil you’ll need to cover a patch of ground in the yard. These real-life problems are a great way to see math skills applied in everyday life!




 
  

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